Mineral Resources Act

Overview

2014 marked a new era for the Northwest Territories’ land and resource management regime.

Devolution shifted authority over these resources from the federal government to the territorial government — bringing control of the minerals resource industries home for the first time since NWT production began in the 1930’s.

Now, with Devolution a reality, we are preparing to develop a leading-edge, made-in-the-North Mineral Resources Act — and we want your input!

Mission

The Mineral Resources Act will be designed to meet the Northwest Territories’ unique needs, increase competitiveness in the mining sector, promote a sustainable and diversified economy, protect the

Overview

2014 marked a new era for the Northwest Territories’ land and resource management regime.

Devolution shifted authority over these resources from the federal government to the territorial government — bringing control of the minerals resource industries home for the first time since NWT production began in the 1930’s.

Now, with Devolution a reality, we are preparing to develop a leading-edge, made-in-the-North Mineral Resources Act — and we want your input!

Mission

The Mineral Resources Act will be designed to meet the Northwest Territories’ unique needs, increase competitiveness in the mining sector, promote a sustainable and diversified economy, protect the natural environment, and respect the rights and traditions of Indigenous peoples.

How will we get there?

This legislation will follow a six-step process.

  1. Initial Scoping: Research in collaboration with stakeholders and experts to set the stage for the project
  2. Public Engagement: Getting input from Indigenous governments and organizations, industry, other stakeholders, and the public. Continuing through December 1, 2017
  3. Development of Draft Act: Based on input from engagement. Proposed for completion Summer 2018
  4. Section 35 Consultation: Consultation on potential impact to Aboriginal or Treaty rights. Proposed for Fall 2018.
  5. Introduction to Passage: The Bill will be introduced and debated in the Legislative Assembly. Proposed for completion Fall 2019.
  6. Implementation: Once the Bill is passed, steps will be taken to implement the Act, including the development of supporting regulations, training materials and public awareness content

Opportunities and Limitations

What It Could Do

The Act would, at minimum, govern:

  • Benefits to residents (e.g., royalties)
  • Reporting on mineral types and locations
  • Rights to explore and mine
  • Rules for staking and maintaining mineral claims

The current Mining Regulations will be replaced by the proposed Act. This will be informed by input from Indigenous governments and organizations, stakeholders, and members of the public.

What It Can’t Do

The Act will not alter the following laws, regulations, and agreements already in place affecting mining and exploration in the NWT:

Indigenous Land Settlement Agreements

No land settlement agreements or ongoing land claim negotiations will be affected by the proposed Act.

Regional Land and Water Boards

The authorities of the regional land and water boards are established under the Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act. The Act will be designed to complement their functions.


  • Socioeconomic Policy Research Available

    3 months ago
    1 page photo

    The GNWT has released socioeconomic policy research commissioned to inform a review of socioeconomic benefit generation for NWT mining.

    This independent study, titled Policies for Generating Socioeconomic Benefits from Natural Resource Extraction Projects, was commissioned to stimulate internal policy discussions as part of a review of Socio-Economic Agreements being completed by the Department of Industry, Tourism and Investment.

    It is also being used to inform policy development for the Mineral Resources Act.

    The report was authored by Eric Werker — Associate Professor at Simon Fraser University’s Beedie School of Business and a leading researcher in the field of natural resource governance.

    The paper is being released in the interest of transparency after obtaining appropriate permissions from the author, and in response to requests.

    View the document here.

    Disclaimer:

    This paper was acquired by the GNWT from a third party. Papers are accepted by the GNWT in varying conditions and degrees of completeness. Its purpose was for information and consideration as part of policy development.

    The advice, opinions, statements and information provided are not necessarily represented or endorsed by the GNWT.


    The GNWT has released socioeconomic policy research commissioned to inform a review of socioeconomic benefit generation for NWT mining.

    This independent study, titled Policies for Generating Socioeconomic Benefits from Natural Resource Extraction Projects, was commissioned to stimulate internal policy discussions as part of a review of Socio-Economic Agreements being completed by the Department of Industry, Tourism and Investment.

    It is also being used to inform policy development for the Mineral Resources Act.

    The report was authored by Eric Werker — Associate Professor at Simon Fraser University’s Beedie School of Business and a leading researcher in the field of natural resource governance.

    The paper is being released in the interest of transparency after obtaining appropriate permissions from the author, and in response to requests.

    View the document here.

    Disclaimer:

    This paper was acquired by the GNWT from a third party. Papers are accepted by the GNWT in varying conditions and degrees of completeness. Its purpose was for information and consideration as part of policy development.

    The advice, opinions, statements and information provided are not necessarily represented or endorsed by the GNWT.


  • News Release: Mineral Resources Act What We Heard Document Released

    11 months ago
    Mineral resources act what we heard   key elements page 01

    YELLOWKNIFE (JANUARY 23, 2018) — The Government of the Northwest Territories has released its What We Heard report on public engagements that will inform the development of a new NWT Mineral Resources Act (MRA).

    The GNWT’s public engagement on the MRA encompassed seven well-attended community visits across the NWT and submissions collected from an interactive engagement portal, small-group meetings, email, social media, phone, and mail.

    The analysis and synthesis of engagement findings was completed with the International Institute for Sustainable Development — an international consulting firm specializing in natural resource governance. These findings, together with the results of the GNWT’s...

    YELLOWKNIFE (JANUARY 23, 2018) — The Government of the Northwest Territories has released its What We Heard report on public engagements that will inform the development of a new NWT Mineral Resources Act (MRA).

    The GNWT’s public engagement on the MRA encompassed seven well-attended community visits across the NWT and submissions collected from an interactive engagement portal, small-group meetings, email, social media, phone, and mail.

    The analysis and synthesis of engagement findings was completed with the International Institute for Sustainable Development — an international consulting firm specializing in natural resource governance. These findings, together with the results of the GNWT’s preliminary scoping exercise, cross-jurisdictional reviews, and extensive policy research already completed will now guide and inform the development of a new Mineral Resources Act for the NWT.

    Proposed Key elements for a new Mineral Resources Act are included in the report.

    The development of homegrown mineral legislation to address the unique needs of the NWT is central to the objectives of the GNWT’s Mineral Development Strategy and a stated commitment of the GNWT’s 2016-2019 Mandate.

    Quote:

    “I would like to thank everyone who participated in this public engagement process. We heard you. We listened. And we are going to use this information to make sure your perspectives are considered in the final product. I am pleased to see this legislation moving along on-schedule with a solid process at its core. I am confident we will conclude this Assembly with modern, homegrown legislation the NWT can be proud of.”
    - Wally Schumann, Minister of Industry, Tourism and Investment

    Quick facts:

    · The release of the What We Heard document allows the GNWT to begin moving forward on the policy development and drafting phase.

    · The document reports on nine overarching themes raised during the extensive 120-day public engagement that will inform the drafting of the new Act.

    o Land access in prospecting and exploration

    o Mineral tenure

    o Indigenous engagement and consultation

    o Revenues

    o Socio-economic benefits

    o Transparency, public accountability and ministerial authority

    o Online map staking

    o Inspections, monitoring and auditing

    o Rehabilitation and closure

    o The GNWT visited Yellowknife, Norman Wells, Inuvik, Fort Simpson, Hay River, Fort Smith and Behchokǫ̀ during public engagement.

    · Small group meetings were solicited from Indigenous governments and organizations, municipalities, non-governmental organizations, industry, regulatory authorities and other stakeholders.

    · More than 2200 outgoing communications were sent to solicit engagement and build awareness about the process.

    · 516 submissions were contributed to the engagement from all stakeholders.

    Relevant links:

    · WWH Report

    · MRA Engagement Portal

    · MRA Newsroom

    · Mineral Development Strategy

    Media contact:

    Mike Westwick
    Communications Officer
    Industry, Tourism and Investment
    Mike_Westwick@gov.nt.ca
    1-867-688-0958
  • Mineral Resources Act: Comments Due By December 1

    about 1 year ago
    12776 360x360 eng

    120 days of engagement on the NWT’s new Mineral Resources Act will soon come to a close.

    Input will be accepted through end of day December 1, 2017.

    Don’t miss your chance to HAVE YOUR SAY on the NWT’s first homegrown legislation governing mining and exploration.

    Join the discussion:

    Department of Industry, Tourism and Investment

    Mining Recorder’s Office

    Suite 207, Scotia Centre 2nd Floor

    5102, 50th Avenue

    P.O. Box 1320

    Yellowknife, NT X1A 2L9

    • In-person:

    Mining Recorder’s Office

    Suite 207,...

    120 days of engagement on the NWT’s new Mineral Resources Act will soon come to a close.

    Input will be accepted through end of day December 1, 2017.

    Don’t miss your chance to HAVE YOUR SAY on the NWT’s first homegrown legislation governing mining and exploration.

    Join the discussion:

    Department of Industry, Tourism and Investment

    Mining Recorder’s Office

    Suite 207, Scotia Centre 2nd Floor

    5102, 50th Avenue

    P.O. Box 1320

    Yellowknife, NT X1A 2L9

    • In-person:

    Mining Recorder’s Office

    Suite 207, Scotia Centre, 2nd Floor

    5102, 50th Avenue

    Yellowknife, NT

    Office Hours:

    Monday – Friday:

    8:30am – 12pm

    12:30pm – 4:00pm


    For more information

    Mike Westwick

    Communications Officer

    Department of Industry, Tourism and Investment

    Government of the Northwest Territories

    Mike_Westwick@gov.nt.ca(link sends e-mail)

    1-867-767-9202 ext.63039


  • 120 Days of Engagement Continues at YK Geoscience Forum

    about 1 year ago
    Img 2855

    he GNWT’s Department of ITI hosted a public engagement session at the Yellowknife Geoscience Forum this week to gain even more input for its development of the NWT’s first homegrown mining and exploration Act.

    This was the latest session in the continuing, 120-day public engagement phase through which we have communicated directly with more than 1700 residents and stakeholders thus far.

    The two-hour session, which was also open to the public, drew many delegates from the forum with experience in geoscience, mining, exploration, and land management.

    Some stayed for the duration of the session — taking advantage of the chance...

    he GNWT’s Department of ITI hosted a public engagement session at the Yellowknife Geoscience Forum this week to gain even more input for its development of the NWT’s first homegrown mining and exploration Act.

    This was the latest session in the continuing, 120-day public engagement phase through which we have communicated directly with more than 1700 residents and stakeholders thus far.

    The two-hour session, which was also open to the public, drew many delegates from the forum with experience in geoscience, mining, exploration, and land management.

    Some stayed for the duration of the session — taking advantage of the chance to chat on a wide variety of topics related to mining and exploration.

    This is the eighth such in-person engagement session, with well-attended sessions having been held in seven communities across the NWT since early-August.

    In addition to in-person sessions, NWT residents are participating online at an interactive public engagement site, by email, phone, and mail.

    The public engagement phase ends December 1, 2017.

    The MRA is legislation which will govern mining and exploration in the NWT. Its development is one of the most significant legislative tasks undertaken since 2014’s Devolution agreement.

    Didn’t make it to the sessions? We still want to hear from YOU!

    Take part in our discussion forums, complete our survey, submit your comments, or have your questions answered on this site. You can also submit by email, phone, or mail.

  • Mineral Review and Benchmarking Research Released

    about 1 year ago
    Mackenzie mts 2009 yuill 121

    The Government of the Northwest Territories has released a report with initial scoping research completed by a consultant to set the stage for the Mineral Resources Act project.

    The independent report includes an overview of the NWT’s current mineral resources regulatory regime and evaluates where they sit compared to best practices from global jurisdictions.

    Andrew Bauer, the consultant who completed the report, is world-renowned for his work in natural resource governance. Governments and organizations around the globe have drawn from his expertise to overhaul and improve their approach to managing their natural resources.

    Follow...

    The Government of the Northwest Territories has released a report with initial scoping research completed by a consultant to set the stage for the Mineral Resources Act project.

    The independent report includes an overview of the NWT’s current mineral resources regulatory regime and evaluates where they sit compared to best practices from global jurisdictions.

    Andrew Bauer, the consultant who completed the report, is world-renowned for his work in natural resource governance. Governments and organizations around the globe have drawn from his expertise to overhaul and improve their approach to managing their natural resources.

    Follow the hyperlinks to view the full report, and a Q+A with Bauer on natural resource governance.

    Disclaimer

    The views expressed in this report are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the GNWT.

    The information contained in this report is the product of publicly available and internal GNWT documents as well as interviews carried out in the NWT and remotely from March to May 2017. Independent verification or audit of all statements was not possible, though verification was attempted where possible.

    As such, the author denies responsibility over assertions made by credible interviewees erroneously.

    For More Information

    Mike Westwick

    Communications Officer

    Department of Industry, Tourism and Investment

    Government of the Northwest Territories

    Mike_Westwick@gov.nt.ca

    1-867-767-9202 ext.63039

  • Mineral Resources Act: Public Engagement Session Update Vol. 3

    about 1 year ago
    Mra wally w trevor beck and donna lee

    We’re on the homestretch for the in-person portion of our public engagements for the new Mineral Resources Act.

    We headed down to Hay River and Fort Smith last week to hear what the South Slave had to say about mining and exploration as we develop the first ever made-in-the-NWT legislation to govern the minerals industry.

    Let’s take a look back at these sessions.

    Hay River

    The team flew into Hay River on the morning of Monday September 11 and got to work right away.

    The day kicked off with a meeting with representatives from the Katlodeeche First Nations to collect...

    We’re on the homestretch for the in-person portion of our public engagements for the new Mineral Resources Act.

    We headed down to Hay River and Fort Smith last week to hear what the South Slave had to say about mining and exploration as we develop the first ever made-in-the-NWT legislation to govern the minerals industry.

    Let’s take a look back at these sessions.

    Hay River

    The team flew into Hay River on the morning of Monday September 11 and got to work right away.

    The day kicked off with a meeting with representatives from the Katlodeeche First Nations to collect their input ahead of the sessions. This is in addition to formal consultations which will take place later in the legislative process.


    People were ready and waiting when the doors opened, with the largest rush of the day coming at the beginning of the session.

    Minister of Industry, Tourism and Investment Wally Schumann was on-site taking in the engagement process, with Mayor Brad Mapes, Deputy Mayor Donna Lee Jungkind, and Hay River Metis Council President Trevor Beck rounding out the local delegation that came to have their say.


    All-told, the Hay River session attracted 23 people throughout the evening. Many stuck around for an hour or two, taking the time to speak at-length with experts on our four discussion themes.

    Fort Smith

    Fort Smith’s session was held at Roaring Rapids Hall the next day from 3-8pm.

    Several of the town’s best-known figures from Métis leadership, government, and business were present.

    Those who attended tended to stick around for a while, with many having experience in local governance and a deep interest in helping their regions succeed. This meant we collected a ton of quality information from this session — all of which will be considered as we develop this landmark legislation.

    Next up…

    The Behchoko engagement session has officially been re-scheduled for Tuesday September 26, 2017 from 3-8pm at the Behchoko Cultural Centre.

    We’re looking forward to hearing what those who come out have to say about mining and exploration.


  • Mineral Resources Act: Public Engagement Session Update Vol. 2

    about 1 year ago
    Img 9543

    We’re more than halfway through our engagement roadshow for the new Mineral Resources Act—the Northwest Territories’ first ever homegrown mining legislation.

    After covering the capital and heading down to Fort Simpson to hear from the Dehcho, we went north to Norman Wells and Inuvik to hear from folks in the Sahtu and Beaufort Delta.

    Let’s take a look back at these sessions.

    Norman Wells

    The engagement team touched down in Norman Wells September 5 and set up their stations in the Royal Canadian Legion.

    Doors opened at 3pm. Nearly 20 people showed up, with folks continuing to stream in until...

    We’re more than halfway through our engagement roadshow for the new Mineral Resources Act—the Northwest Territories’ first ever homegrown mining legislation.

    After covering the capital and heading down to Fort Simpson to hear from the Dehcho, we went north to Norman Wells and Inuvik to hear from folks in the Sahtu and Beaufort Delta.

    Let’s take a look back at these sessions.

    Norman Wells

    The engagement team touched down in Norman Wells September 5 and set up their stations in the Royal Canadian Legion.

    Doors opened at 3pm. Nearly 20 people showed up, with folks continuing to stream in until the very end of the session at 8pm.

    Almost every single person who attended filled out a survey with questions important to the development of this landmark legislation.

    On top of the public session, senior officials from the Government of the Northwest Territories’ Department of Industry, Tourism and Investment (ITI) met with officials from the Sahtu Secretariat and Norman Wells Land Corporation to gain their valued input.

    Inuvik

    Folks in Inuvik braved the rain to head down to the Community Lounge at the Midnight Sun Recreation Centre and have their say on mining and exploration.

    People started coming in almost immediately, with some sticking around for almost an hour to have their say.

    We heard many different perspectives throughout these conversations. Some were positive; some constructive; all valuable for consideration as we develop the Mineral Resources Act.

    In addition to the public session, ITI officials met with partners from the Inuvialuit Regional Corporation to collect their views on how mining should be governed.

    Next up…

    We’re in the South Slave region to hear from Hay River and Fort Smith. Stay tuned for updates!

    Want to have your say, but can’t make it out to the sessions? Visit Engage-ITI.ca/MRA to take part in discussion forums, submit comments, and complete a survey to contribute to a well-governed minerals industry for the NWT. Submissions are open until December 1.


  • Mineral Resources Act Discussions: Working Together

    about 1 year ago
    Engagement team

    As community visits for our first ever Northwest Territories-made Mineral Resources Act continue, we want to highlight four key themes for discussion we will be focusing on at these public engagement sessions.

    Mining and mineral exploration projects require governments, businesses, and people with different priorities and with different mandates to work together to find common ground and reach the best outcomes for their own values and stakeholders.

    In the Northwest Territories (NWT), this includes Indigenous governments and organizations; public governments; mining and exploration companies; other stakeholders like land and water boards; and all residents across the territory.

    There’s no denying...

    As community visits for our first ever Northwest Territories-made Mineral Resources Act continue, we want to highlight four key themes for discussion we will be focusing on at these public engagement sessions.

    Mining and mineral exploration projects require governments, businesses, and people with different priorities and with different mandates to work together to find common ground and reach the best outcomes for their own values and stakeholders.

    In the Northwest Territories (NWT), this includes Indigenous governments and organizations; public governments; mining and exploration companies; other stakeholders like land and water boards; and all residents across the territory.

    There’s no denying it can be complicated, but the Government of the Northwest Territories has the chance to put clear processes in place to help these groups find ways to work together for the best future possible.

    These processes could be for things like Indigenous engagement and consultation, understanding expectations, transparency, and accountability.

    There are a few overarching principles we see as important in this conversation.

    • Respecting the rights and traditions of Indigenous peoples
    • Bringing certainty to the processes of engagement and consultation
    • Encouraging meaningful dialogue between mining companies and Indigenous peoples

    Under this general theme, there are a few key topics to consider.

    • Section 35 Consultations: Canada’s Constitution Act enshrines protections for Aboriginal and Treaty rights, and requires official consultation with Indigenous governments when actions could negatively affect those rights. Should we clarify roles and requirements for consultation with this new Act? If so, how?
    • Dialogue between Industry and Indigenous governments, organizations, and peoples: We should make sure processes support real dialogue between industry and Indigenous partners. How can we promote dialogue between Indigenous peoples and mining companies? Are there ways we can make sure mining companies engage with Indigenous communities early and often as a project develops?
    • Creating shared expectations: Neither the current Mining Regulations — which the Mineral Resources Act will replace and improve— nor the federal Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act provides certainty on when consultation is required. This is particularly true for early-stage exploration projects. They also do not set out clearly what roles industry and Indigenous governments should play. How could the new Act provide clarity and certainty to these processes? How can the GNWT ensure the new Act creates shared expectations for both Indigenous governments and industry partners?

    Want more details on these topics? Sign up here to HAVE YOUR SAY on this landmark legislation using discussion forums, comment submission, and surveys.

  • Mineral Resources Act: Public Engagement Update - Vol.1

    over 1 year ago
    Brad engaging

    We asked for the input of Northwest Territories residents on our first ever homegrown mining and exploration legislation and hit the road about a week-and-a-half ago to collect it in-person in seven communities and two languages.

    We’re now halfway through these public engagement sessions, and NWT residents have come out in force to share their hopes and ideas for the future of the NWT’s mineral resources.

    We’ve valued the opportunity to hear so many different perspectives — all of which will be considered as we develop the legislation.

    Let’s take a look back at the first sessions.

    Yellowknife Public Session

    ...

    We asked for the input of Northwest Territories residents on our first ever homegrown mining and exploration legislation and hit the road about a week-and-a-half ago to collect it in-person in seven communities and two languages.

    We’re now halfway through these public engagement sessions, and NWT residents have come out in force to share their hopes and ideas for the future of the NWT’s mineral resources.

    We’ve valued the opportunity to hear so many different perspectives — all of which will be considered as we develop the legislation.

    Let’s take a look back at the first sessions.

    Yellowknife Public Session

    The in-person sessions launched in the capital on August 28.

    Beginning at 3pm, members of the public began arriving and were treated to in-depth, one-on-one conversations with experts at four themed tables. These experts took in feedback and answered any questions they had.

    It was a well-attended session, with 75 people dropping by to have their say.

    People continued streaming in until the very end, with some sticking around to talk mining and exploration for more than an hour.

    French Language Session

    Next, we put on a territory-wide session in French.

    Several attendees showed up in-person to engage on mining and exploration in their preferred language.

    A phone line was open to take calls from across the NWT in French to collect feedback and answer questions on the minerals industry.

    Fort Simpson

    The team flew into Fort Simpson on August 31 and were treated to a higher than expected turnout, with nearly 50 people making their way through the engagement session.

    Of all sessions to-date, Fort Simpson’s saw the most surveys filled out.

    Community leaders, including Chief Gerald Antoine, were among the attendees who came by to share their thoughts on mining and exploration.

    Assistant Deputy Minister Pamela Strand takes input from Chief Gerald Antoine in Fort Simpson

    Next up…

    We’ve taken our public drop-in sessions north with stops in Norman Wells and Inuvik. Then, we're off to Hay River and Fort Smith. Stay tuned for more updates.

    Have thoughts on mining and exploration? Sign up here to have your say on this landmark legislation.
  • Mineral Resources Act Discussions: Maximizing Benefits

    over 1 year ago
    Img 2363

    As community visits for our first ever Northwest Territories-made Mineral Resources Act begin, we want to highlight four key themes for discussion we will be focusing on at these public engagement sessions.

    There is no denying the Northwest Territories has a bounty of valuable natural resources. It is important to make sure when these resources are developed, Northwest Territories (NWT) residents benefit.

    These benefits can include royalties collected on resource revenues, employment for NWT residents, and benefits agreements with communities and the territorial government.

    The Government of the Northwest Territories (GNWT) can play a role in promoting these kinds of...

    As community visits for our first ever Northwest Territories-made Mineral Resources Act begin, we want to highlight four key themes for discussion we will be focusing on at these public engagement sessions.

    There is no denying the Northwest Territories has a bounty of valuable natural resources. It is important to make sure when these resources are developed, Northwest Territories (NWT) residents benefit.

    These benefits can include royalties collected on resource revenues, employment for NWT residents, and benefits agreements with communities and the territorial government.

    The Government of the Northwest Territories (GNWT) can play a role in promoting these kinds of benefits, and keeping them in the North with this new legislation. This is why maximizing benefits emerged as an important theme as we draft our first ever legislation for mining and exploration.

    There are a few overarching principles we see as important in this conversation.

    • Maximizing benefits for NWT residents
    • Striking a balance between encouraging responsible mineral development and ensuring residents get a fair deal for natural resources

    This public engagement process is all about hearing from YOU on how we can reach these kinds of goals.

    Under this general theme, there a couple of key topics to consider.

    • Revenues: The GNWT collects royalties, taxes, and fees from mining and exploration companies, which can then be invested in programs and services contributing to the success and well-being of NWT residents. Is the GNWT collecting enough revenue from mining and exploration companies? How should the GNWT balance the need to be competitive with the desire to generate more revenue from mining activities?
    • Socio-Economic Benefits: Socio-economic benefits include things like local employment, community investment, and training. Some of these benefits are agreed to in two types of benefit agreements:

    o Impact Benefit Agreements (IBAs): Agreements confidentially negotiated by Indigenous governments with mining companies to tailor benefits provided to the needs of their communities.

    o Socio-Economic Agreements: Agreements negotiated by the GNWT with mining companies to ensure broad benefits for NWT residents.

    We have a chance to look at how these benefits are negotiated, and formalize the process for creating these agreements. Should the new legislation address benefit agreements differently than they are today? Could GNWT involvement or assistance in negotiating IBAs be beneficial? Should incentives be provided to companies that go above-and-beyond in environmental protection or providing community benefits?

    Want more details on these topics? Visit Engage-ITI.ca/MRA to find backgrounders and information, then sign up to HAVE YOUR SAY on this landmark legislation.